China health insurance

China health insurance: Pros and cons of local vs. international plans

China health insurance: Pros and cons of local vs. international plans

Working abroad in China can be both a wondrous and daunting experience. In a land with such a rich culture and varied terrain, one can easily be captivated by the country’s beauty and color. However, the environmental hazards that have come with modernization and challenges faced by those that are not fluent in Mandarin can certainly take a toll on China newbies. Perhaps this is no better exemplified than the Chinese healthcare system, where greatly varying levels of care and foreigner-friendliness can leave expats guessing as to which direction to go. On top of the issue of medical care, there is also the issue of payment. That’s why it’s good to have an overview of the pros and cons of both international and local China health insurance plans, which Pacific Prime China provides below.

China health insurance

Before getting into the pros and cons of each type of plan, it would be good to mention the pros and cons of insurance policies themselves. This gives us a good base of knowledge before we focus on the finer aspects of local vs. international health insurance.

Pros

  • Having private China health insurance allows for access to private healthcare facilities with doctors that speak languages from all over the world. If your medical Mandarin is far from fluent, this is going to go a long way towards helping put you at ease should you need to visit the hospital with a serious condition. After all, effective communication with medical professionals is a must when it comes to effectively addressing your own health needs.
  • Another advantage of accessing private hospitals in China is the shorter waiting times that are found there. This will ensure that you are not placed on a waiting list to receive treatment should the hospital deem it to not be an emergency. Private hospitals will treat you quickly and efficiently.
  • Finally, private hospitals, while they cost more for treatment, generally provide a higher quality of care for their patients. This is due to their possession of the latest medical equipment, as well as internationally trained medical staff.

Cons

Medical insurance isn’t without its drawbacks, including the following:

  • Pre-existing conditions
  • Exclusions
  • Age limits

However, depending on your specific needs, there may be plans available that address these items.

Now let’s dig into the differences between local and international China health insurance.

Local insurance

Pro

By far the biggest advantage of sticking with a local insurance plan is that it will always come with a lower price tag. Since medical costs are well controlled in China, insurers recognize that the risk to them when it comes to covering said costs are not as high. Comparatively, places like the United States and Hong Kong have some of the most expensive healthcare in the world. Therefore, if an insurance company provides global coverage, they are opening themselves up to greater risk, so they charge a higher premium.

Con

As alluded to above, local China health insurance plans only provide healthcare coverage inside of China. This means that if you were to travel anywhere outside of Mainland China’s borders, you will not have any health insurance coverage with your local plan, and will have to pay for treatment out of pocket unless you secure a separate insurance plan.

International insurance

Pros

  • Pretty much the main reason to purchase an international health insurance plan is the freedom of choice that it affords you. Not only can you travel to virtually any country worldwide in order to receive medical treatment, you can also choose any hospital or doctor worldwide as well. You will never have to think, “I wonder if they’ll even treat me in this country,” because you will always have proof that you are covered by a reputable global insurance company.
  • Another often overlooked feature of international health insurance plans is that you can take your policy with you no matter where you go. With local insurance plans, if you or your family decides to move outside of China permanently, you will have to purchase a new insurance policy in your new home country. Under this scenario, any conditions developed while on your local China insurance plan will likely be treated as pre-existing conditions by the next insurer, and coverage will not be able to be obtained in many cases. However, with an international plan, you can simply take your plan with you and still receive full coverage.
  • Finally, there are features that you can find in an international health insurance plan that are not present in local plans. For example, medical evacuation is included in international plans. This feature will relocate you to the nearest appropriate medical facility if the one you are in is ill equipped to address your medical needs. If possible, you may even be able to be flown home for treatment. Many international plans also come with 24 hour customer assistance that will help you make medical arrangements when you are abroad. The assistance this service provides can certainly be invaluable.

Con

Again costs are higher when it comes to international health insurance. You do potentially get a whole world more out of your plan, but you need to make sure that an international health insurance plan is right for you. If you rarely travel, a plan with global coverage may be unnecessary. However, if you do find yourself outside of the country regularly, this type of plan may be ideal for you.

Regardless of which type of insurance is right for you, Pacific Prime China can help. We specialize in international health insurance plans that provide coverage both in your country of residence, as well as virtually anywhere else in the world. Of course, we also sell local plans that will address costs only in China for a lower premium. For more information, contact the helpful insurance advisers at Pacific Prime China today! They are standing by to answer any of your questions, provide you with plan comparisons from some of China’s best insurance companies, and give you a free price quote.

Posted by Travis Jones in Expat Health Insurance, Health Insurance
Maternity Insurance in China: Can you buy when you’re already pregnant?

Maternity Insurance in China: Can you buy when you’re already pregnant?

Mothers-to-be have so much to think about and plan for with regards to the arrival of their new bundle of joy. Baby showers, room decorations, picking the right colors for everything depending on if it will be a boy or a girl. These are the types of fun things that people prefer to focus on when imagining their new family unit. What we don’t like to think about are the unpleasant thoughts of what could go wrong during pregnancy, labor and delivery. This is a sad fact, as planning ahead is imperative if you want to make sure that your new baby is completely covered by medical insurance no matter what happens. Here, Pacific Prime China examines how you can make sure your newborn is covered by maternity insurance in China.

What is Maternity Insurance and what does it cover?

Maternity Insurance in China is a separate type of coverage from what normally comes with health insurance coverage. This is because it is specially designed to address the costs associated with the development and birth of a new baby. Since a certain amount of cost is all but guaranteed should a woman become pregnant, as opposed to normal health insurance, in which some people may not get sick while insured, these plans can be a bit pricey and come with restrictions, perhaps the biggest of which are waiting periods, which we will address below.

As far as specific benefits provided by Maternity Insurance, after conception it includes benefits for pre-natal care, which can include medical consultations, regular checkups, ultrasounds, blood and urine tests, birth defect screenings and more. Then, once your bun has been in the oven long enough, Maternity Insurance will pay for the costs of labor and delivery, as well as costs related to the treatment of any complications at birth for both mother and child. It should be noted here that Maternity Insurance provides benefits regardless of your baby being born naturally or via caesarian section.

Beyond these items which are normally covered by Maternity Insurance, plans can also provide benefits for fertility treatment (including In-Vitro Fertility treatment), and costs related to treatment of congenital birth defects.

Why obtain Maternity Insurance in China?

Generally speaking, what level of insurance coverage would parents want when it comes to the birth of their new child? The best, of course! However, without Maternity Insurance, your options for affordable labor and delivery can be limited. This is because the best healthcare provided in China is found in private hospitals, which are a great deal more expensive than what you can expect to pay at public facilities. In fact, you can pay as much as RMB 100,000 for a maternity delivery package in a Chinese public hospital in a city like Shanghai.

Beyond just the price and level of care, there are other considerations that expatriates living in China should account for. One of the largest among these is the potential language barrier. If you are not fluent in Mandarin, then you may have trouble communicating with staff at public hospitals in China, which could be a source of great tension and worry if things seem to go the slightest bit wrong. At private hospitals in China, there are internationally trained doctors and finding one that speaks your language should not be too much trouble. This is all the more reason to ensure that you are free to attend a private hospital.

Waiting periods

A waiting period is a specific amount of time that must pass following the start of an insurance policy before a claim can be made against it. While most of the time waiting periods are not a hugely significant amount of time, when it comes to Maternity Insurance in China, they can be quite lengthy, and make all the difference in the world as to whether your pregnancy, labor and delivery will be covered or not. This is because many insurance companies will make their members possess maternity insurance for 12 months before it can be claimed against.

Now, you may be doing the math and saying, “Wait a minute. That means that if I get Maternity Insurance just before I get pregnant, I won’t have any coverage for my pregnancy.” That’s right. Not only is it far too late to have the lab tests, doctors visits, labor and delivery covered after a child has already been conceived, even if you won’t be pregnant for a month Maternity Insurance is almost certainly likely to not pay out. While there are plans available with waiting periods of only 10 months, this is likely the shortest you will find on the market. And even with a 10 month waiting period, you would want to avoid getting pregnant one month after obtaining such a plan because pre-mature births do happen, and you could miss out on covering birthing costs if the baby comes early.

What to do if it’s too late for maternity coverage

In the event that you are pregnant and do not have a Maternity Insurance plan in place, your options are certainly more limited, but there are still steps you can take to protect your baby as much as possible. Specifically, obtaining a newborn health insurance policy would be an excellent idea.  While this type of insurance does not address costs associated specifically with pregnancy, labor, delivery, or complications that occur prior to birth, after your baby arrives it can be invaluable. This is because, even after getting through the entire birthing process, a newborn is still quite vulnerable to a whole host of diseases that can be acquired almost immediately once he or she is out in the open.

The moral of the story: Plan ahead!

Obviously, if you want to get Maternity Insurance in China, you are going to need to overcome the waiting periods attached to most plans. That means that you need to have a plan in place well ahead of when you plan to conceive in order to be covered through the duration of your pregnancy – up to a year in advance of conception! For this reason, communicate openly with your partner about the timing of your next baby, and get your Maternity Insurance plan now and not when it’s too late.

If you have any questions about the information presented above, or when to secure maternity insurance before it is too late, contact the knowledgeable insurance experts at Pacific Prime China. Our agents are standing by to not only provide you with comparisons of insurance plans offered by China’s best insurers, but also give you a free price quote.

Posted by Travis Jones in Health Insurance, Maternity Insurance
Men in China should watch out for these diseases

Men in China should watch out for these diseases

When it comes to a man and his sense of manhood, there isn’t much that is more important to him than his sexual health and overall vitality. After all, as animals every man has an evolutionary predisposition to want to reproduce, and if a man cannot fulfill this duty he may feel that he is something less than a man. While we know that this is not the case, it’s nevertheless important to maintain sexual health, as it is an excellent indicator for general wellness and quality of life as a man ages. Just as in the rest of the world, there are certain ailments that men in China need to be concerned about, as they may be at risk. Here, we talk about some of these illnesses, as well as the best ways to prevent and treat them while living in China.

Diseases prevalent among men in China

In this case we’re referring to diseases that can ultimately lead to a man’s death. You may know this already, but the two most common causes of death in men worldwide are cardiovascular disease and cancer, and China is no different. What’s more, men in China are more likely to die due to these kinds of diseases than women.

Heart disease: Despite being the number one killer of people worldwide, heart disease is the 2nd largest killer of men in China, accounting for 22% of total deaths. Men disproportionately engage in risky behavior for heart disease vis-à-vis women when it comes to smoking and alcohol consumption, so it is up to individuals to control these types of habits if they want to reduce their risk.

Cancer: As the #1 killer of people in China, cancer accounts for more than 7,500 deaths per day. In 2015, it is estimated that 4.3 million people developed cancer, with 2.8 million people dying of the disease. While men’s health news tends to focus on prostate and testicular cancer, neither of these is counted in the top 5 cancers among men in China, which include colorectal, liver, esophagus, stomach and lung cancers. These 5 types of cancer account for over two thirds of male cancer cases. Men in China are more likely to not only develop cancer, but to die because of it.

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Also known as sexually transmitted infections, the prevalence of STDs has shown signs of dramatic increases in the past decade. For example, while cases of HIV/AIDS recorded in 2010 numbered 500,000, this number inflated to 800,000 in 2011. Other sexually transmitted diseases to be worried about in China include Chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, gonorrhea and syphilis. Admittedly, up to date information on the prevalence of specific STDs in China is somewhat hard to come by, so it’s hard to say for sure just how big of a danger unprotected sex is in China in 2017, but certainly it is better to be safe than sorry when potentially life threatening diseases are involved.

Risks

Beyond the illnesses mentioned above there are some risk factors that are prevalent in China that can lead to them. One of the chief among these is tobacco use. 52.9% of Chinese male adults smoke tobacco, with 45.4% of the male population smoking daily. Even among the youth in China (aged 13-15), more than one in ten young men smoke tobacco regularly. This is quite a striking difference from female smoking numbers, which show only 2.4% of adults and 1.8% of young ladies smoking frequently. Additionally, the World Health Organization has reported that the global average of deaths attributable to smoking in 1990 was 6%, while in China it was 9.2%. The latter figure is expected to rise to 16.6% by 2020.

As far as what this means for men’s health, respiratory diseases such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be a direct result of smoking. Not to mention lung cancer, which has been the most common form of cancer in China in recent years not only because of the prevalence of smoking, but also because of the air pollution issues facing the country. It is posited that by the year 2020 there will be 800,000 new lung cancer cases each year in China. Smoking also is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and a host of other health problems, as it is believed to lower general overall health and even cause reduced fertility.

Other major risk factors for health include weight/obesity, alcohol intake, and sedentary living.

Getting protection

Of course, the very best way to protect yourself from heart disease, cancer and respiratory disease is prevention. Diet and exercise to keep weight low and your heart strong are highly advisable. Also, try your best to avoid air pollution and limit your intake of alcohol, tobacco and other controlled substances. As far as sexually transmitted diseases are concerned, practicing safe sex by using condoms greatly reduces risk, but regular screenings are also a great idea.

As you can tell from the information above, men in China do have a number of things to worry about when it comes to their health. For this reason, it may be beneficial for men to have a comprehensive health insurance plan in place to provide efficient medical treatment and protection from related costs. This is especially true for expatriate men living in China, as they are far more likely to attend higher cost private hospitals rather than public hospitals where communication can be an issue.

Pacific Prime China offers international health insurance plans that will be attractive to expats in China due to the fact that they provide medical insurance coverage both inside the PRC and back in their home country, as well as virtually any country around the world. To find out if this type of insurance plan is right for you, contact the helpful insurance advisers at Pacific Prime today. They can provide you with plan comparisons from major insurance companies and give you a free quote.

Posted by Travis Jones in Illness
China featured in 2017 International Private Medical Insurance inflation report

China featured in 2017 International Private Medical Insurance inflation report

Pacific Prime China is excited to announce that our global partner Pacific Prime has released the 2017 annual edition of the International Private Medical Insurance (IPMI) inflation report, which reveals the overall 2016 global premium inflation rate and presents analysis on premium prices charged by top IPMI plans offered by leading insurance providers in 10 key locations around the world. These countries are categorized into the following regions: Southeast Asia, Middle East, and Rest of World.

Presented in an easy to read format, this report is highly recommended for anyone interested in looking at how much they’re paying for IPMI, and should also be of high interest for insurers looking for information on premium prices in the various regions.

This article presents an overview of the findings from the latest IPMI inflation report. To access the report, click here for the website version, or click here to download your FREE PDF copy.

Key findings on global IPMI inflation

Pacific Prime’s report reveals that the average global IPMI inflation rate in 2016 was 9.2% – the exact same as the inflation rate in 2015. As shown in the graph below, the inflation rates observed in 2015 and 2016 have significantly increased from the 2014 inflation figure of 7.1%. The inflation rate in 2015 was around 5 percentage points higher than the average Consumer Price (CP) inflation rate in the countries included in this report – this remained consistent in 2016.

IPMI inflation in China

China has seen an increase in demand for quality healthcare services from the middle classes and an improved perception of health insurance. The average IPMI inflation figure in China hiked up to 12.06% in 2016 – 2.86% higher than the average global IPMI inflation rate, and a significant increase from China’s 2015 inflation rate of 9.5%. The trends impacting IPMI inflation in China include the maturing insurance market and growing government health regulations.

Key IPMI inflation drivers

As with the previous reports, the following 4 long term inflation drivers continue to make up a strong part of the explanation behind IPMI inflation:

  • New medical technology: The high costs of new medical technology research are usually passed onto patients by increasing healthcare fees, subsequently leading to inflating premium prices.
  • An imbalance of healthcare resources: Due to a range of factors including the ageing population, the imbalance of supply and demand for healthcare resources continues to increase – insurers cover the risks posed from growing demand by inflating premiums.
  • Increased compensation for healthcare professionals: The rising salaries of medical professionals are covered by rising healthcare costs, thus leading to the rise in premium prices.
  • Healthcare overutilization: There’s a growing trend towards the introduction of state-provided mandatory insurance in various regions, such as in the UAE. This has led to an increased strain on healthcare and an increase in the number of claims submitted, and insurers are responding to this by hiking up premiums.

The 2017 IPMI report has also identified 3 newly emerged trends driving premium inflation:

  • Global economic uncertainty: Global, regional, and domestic pressures have had an impact on the low economic growth observed in the countries included in this report, all of which influence IPMI through flow on effects. For example, China has experienced a growing resistance to foreign expat workers as GDP slows.
  • Changing population dynamics: The report has identified an expat “exodus” in some of the most popular expat locations, such as in Singapore and the UAE. Despite slowly dwindling expat numbers in certain regions, there’s an observable growth in demand for IPMI from increasingly wealthy local populations and high networth individuals (HNW).
  • Increasing availability of technology: Although technology has not yet had a significant impact on IPMI, Pacific Prime predicts this IPMI inflation driver will increase in force in the foreseeable future. For example, as the use of big data continues to become increasingly sophisticated, the management of insurance premium inflation may see an improvement in the years to come.

For a more in-depth analysis on the 2017 IPMI inflation report findings, you can view it here and download it for FREE here. If you’d like to have a chat with us, feel free to contact us today and one of our insurance advisors will be in touch shortly.

Posted by Jess in Health Insurance, News
5 tips for getting the most out of your health checkup in China

5 tips for getting the most out of your health checkup in China

The importance of maintaining good health continues to take central precedence in the Chinese government’s reforms, and this has been exemplified in the “Healthy China 2030” blueprint released in October, which sets out to improve health literacy in the country. As reported by Xinhua News, Premier Li Keqiang has announced in the Ninth Global Conference on Health Promotion that the current average life expectancy in China is 76.3, beating many middle and high income countries.

With the Healthy China initiative, China hopes to raise the average life expectancy to 79 by 2030. In ensuring that this ambitious goal is reached, the Chinese government has been distributing brochures offering health advice to the public by advocating healthy habits, chief among them being the importance of regular health checkups.

As the age-old saying goes, “prevention is better than cure”. Undergoing regular checkups is important in helping you identify any health concerns you may have before they develop into long term chronic illnesses. With new year’s just around the corner, it’s time to include regular medical exams in your resolutions! This article by Pacific Prime China reveals how to get the most out of your health checkup.

Be prepared for your checkup

To get the most out of your checkup, there are a few things you can do before your appointment so that your doctor can better address any specific areas of concern you may have:

  • Notify your clinic/ doctor about problem areas that you’re concerned about before your appointment. By doing so, your doctor will be better prepared for your checkup beforehand and can then adjust the duration of your appointment accordingly.
  • Prepare previous health records if you’re visiting the clinic for the first time. This can help your doctor by providing key insights on your medical history.
  • Be prepared to provide information on your family’s health history. Do certain diseases run in your family? It may be a good idea to write these down, especially if it’s your first time visiting a particular clinic.
  • Think about questions you may have regarding your body. Have you noticed anything unusual, like new moles or lumps on your body? It’s worth jotting these down.
  • Prepare a list of medications that you’ve been taking – it’s important to let your doctor know what medications you are on, including non-prescription drugs like supplements. This may help reduce the chances of negative interactions between any newly introduced medications and your current medication.

Don’t forget cancer screenings

With regular cancer screenings, any abnormal cells that may turn into cancer will be detected. It may be daunting to undergo these screenings, but detecting any abnormalities as early as possible can really save your life. Here are some of the most common types of cancer screenings:

  • Mammograms to detect breast cancer.
  • Pap test (for women) to identify abnormal cells that may turn into cervical cancer.
  • Screening tests for colon cancer – this is especially important for adults above 50 years old, people with a family history of colon cancer, and people with inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Low-dose computed tomography scans to detect lung cancer. This is especially recommended for people with a history of heavy smoking.

Don’t hesitate to address any embarrassing symptoms

Some people prefer to avoid talking about embarrassing symptoms or illnesses as they consider these a social taboo, but it’s important to be as honest as possible. Doctors deal with and talk about these problem areas every day and are there to provide their professional help. If you’re feeling too uncomfortable, it might help to invite a close friend or family member to accompany you to your appointment.

Mental health is also important

With 180 million people in China suffering from psychiatric disorders, there’s a pressing need to address mental health issues in this country. If you’ve been feeling particularly stressed or unhappy, don’t forget to mention this during your checkup, as your doctor can help refer you to a relevant professional so that, if appropriate, you can proceed with therapy and other forms of treatment.

Make sure your health insurance plan covers checkups

Checkups can be expensive (especially in private and international hospitals), which is why it’s important to check if this is covered by your health insurance plan. Some plans may only cover a percentage of the cost of the checkup, and other plans may cover only basic checkups. Another thing to be aware of is your plan’s preferred network of providers. If you’re going to a clinic that is not listed under your plan’s in-network, you will likely face issues when filing claims.

If you’re unsure of what exactly is covered by your plan or would like some further information, feel free to contact us today.

Posted by Jess in Expat Health Insurance, Health Insurance